Archive for June, 2019


Gordon Lecture: Broadband Photon Tomography

06/28/2019


Prof. Frederik J. Beekman Ph.D. heads the section Radiation, Detection & Medical Imaging at TU Delft University. He co-authored over 150 journal papers and is the inventor on 31 patents. His research interests includes biomedical imaging science, AI and image guided radio(-nuclide) therapy.  He is an associate editor of several journals and founder and CEO/CSO of MILabs (www.milabs.com) that develops and markets high performance biomedical imaging systems.
Below is a summary of his presentation

High Performance Integrated 4x4D PET, SPECT, Optical & X-ray Tomography

In preclinical research scientists have dreamed about a 3D magnifying glass that would allow us to e.g. see various cell functions and structures in a dynamic 4D single scan, and map integrated detailed dynamics of e.g. contrast agents, tracers, pharmaceuticals, receptors and indicators of therapy response in tumours. To meet these and many other imaging needs Dr. Beekman and his lab developed the user friendly fully integrated VECTor-6 imaging platform (WMIC innovation of the Year 2018) comprising:In preclinical research scientists have dreamed about a 3D magnifying glass that would allow us to e.g. see various cell functions and structures in a dynamic 4D single scan, and map integrated detailed dynamics of e.g. contrast agents, tracers, pharmaceuticals, receptors and indicators of therapy response in tumours. To meet these and many other imaging needs Dr. Beekman and his lab developed the user friendly fully integrated VECTor-6 imaging platform (WMIC innovation of the Year 2018) comprising:

A) down to ~0.1 mm SPECT & 0.55 mm PET resolution, with positron-range free PET for otherwise “difficult isotopes” like 124I, 76Br, 86Y, and 82Rb.  B) concurrent sub-mm multi-tracer PET & PET-SPECT  C) sub-second dynamic PET & SPECT  D) sub-mm resolution imaging of α & β-emitting pharmaceuticals,  E)  ultra-high performance low dose X-ray CT and  F) optical tomography (Cherenkov, Fluorescence & Bioluminescence)

In this presentation this highly adaptive and versatile nuclear, optical and structural imaging platform was explained along with many scientific applications contributed by hundreds of worldwide users. Finally, the results of translating their nuclear imaging technologies into <3 mm resolution clinical SPECT (G-SPECT, WMIS Innovation of the Year 2015) was presented.

Gordon Lecture: Radiopharmaceutical Therapy: History, Current Status and Future Potential

06/04/2019


Bennett S. Greenspan, M.D., M.S. received his M.D. degree from the University of Illinois in Chicago. He completed residencies in Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine and is certified in Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Radiology by the ABR and in Nuclear Medicine by the ABNM. He received the M.S. degree in medical physics from UCLA. Dr. Greenspan is devoted to teaching of clinical nuclear medicine and also physics and radiation safety of nuclear medicine to nuclear medicine and radiology residents.  He is also keenly interested in quality and safety in Nuclear Medicine.
Below is a summary of his presentation

History - Radiopharmaceutical therapy began in 1941 with the efforts and insight of Saul Hertz, MD of MGH and also Arthur Roberts, PhD of MIT. From that beginning, I-131 has become an important agent for the treatment of benign and malignant thyroid disease. In the 1980s, two agents, Sr-89 chloride and Sm-153 EDTMP, were introduced for bone pain palliation. Somatostatin receptor targeted therapies were developed in the 1980s and 1990s, leading to FDA-approval of Lu-177 Dotatate in 2018. Radiolabeled antibodies were also being developed in the 1970s – 2000s, with the introduction of two agents in 2002 and 2003. Radium-223 dichloride was approved by the FDA in 2013 for treatment of castrate-resistant metastatic prostate cancer.

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Gordon Lecture: Preoperative and Intraoperative Localization for Pulmonary nodule


Dr. Hyun Koo Kim is Professor and Chief of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery at the Korea University Guro Hospital in Seoul, Korea. He earned his medical degree from Korea University College of Medicine in Seoul Korea in 1996. He finished a Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery residency in 2001 and afterwards completed a fellowship in the Korea University Guro Hospital in 2005. He is an expertise in single port VATS and utilizing 3D thoracoscope during VATS.
Below is a summary of his presentation

Image-guided surgery can be defined as surgery where the operator utilizes surgical devices that incorporate the use of tracking technology in conjunction with a fusion of images in order to guide surgical procedures. 

Preoperative marking via CT-guided localization is the most commonly used techniques for thoracoscopic surgery-based resection of small peripheral pulmonary nodules. But, it was related with resulting in higher rates of pneumothorax, bleeding, and dislodgement.Preoperative marking via CT-guided localization is the most commonly used techniques for thoracoscopic surgery-based resection of small peripheral pulmonary nodules. But, it was related with resulting in higher rates of pneumothorax, bleeding, and dislodgement.

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