Archive for February, 2016


A Computer Modeling-Based Approach to Studying the Biomechanics of Human Anatomy

02/20/2016


According to Dr. Sidney Fels from the University of British Columbia in Canada, computer modeling and simulation of the human body is rapidly becoming a critical and central tool in a broad range of disciplines, including engineering, education, entertainment, physiology and medicine. Detailed geometric models of human anatomy are available for use as instructional aids and providing realistic computer character animation. Dynamic musculoskeletal models are employed in activities ranging from ergonomic analysis to medical research and treatments. Deformable tissue models are used for surgical simulation, and increasingly for other applications as their fidelity improves.

In a conference organized by the Gordon Center, Dr. Fels presented a technology that has the potential of creating dynamic, parametric, multi-scale models of human musculoskeletal anatomy that can be extended to other organ structures and subsystems. To illustrate how this novel technology works, Dr. Fels presented his efforts on modelling the oral, pharyngeal and laryngeal complex to predict functional outcomes, such as chewing, swallowing and speaking.  

Dr. Sidney Fels is the Head of the Human Communication Technologies Research Laboratory and a Professor at the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada    
Dr. Fels presenting his work

Dr. Fels presenting his work

 

New Scintillators for Nuclear Medicine

02/13/2016


Dr. Kanai Shah, President of Radiation Monitoring Devices Inc., discussed new developments in the field of scintillation crystals and their implications on the nuclear medicine imaging.

According to Dr. Shah, the next generation imaging scanners can simultaneously be high-performance and cost-effective thanks to scintillators with higher energy resolution and improved timing.

Dr. Shah delivering his presentation at the Gordon Center

Dr. Shah delivering his presentation at the Gordon Center

New Imaging Technique May Accelerate Understanding of Biological Systems

02/06/2016


Biological systems are comprised of intricate molecules, cells and tissues. Understanding interactions of these components remains a major challenge in biology. In a conference organized by the Gordon Center, Dr. Kwanghun Chung from MIT introduced a new method that enables scalable proteomic imaging of intact systems without requiring any specialized equipment or reagents. The method, termed SWITCH, uniformly secures tissue architecture, native biomolecules, and antigenicity across an entire system by synchronizing the tissue preservation reaction. According to Dr. Chung, the heat and chemical resistant nature of the resulting framework permits virtually unlimited rounds of relabeling of a single tissue with precise co-registration of multiple datasets. Such integrated high-dimensional information may accelerate the understanding of biological systems at multiple levels.

Professor Chung delivering his presentation at the Gordon Center

Professor Chung delivering his presentation at the Gordon Center